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20121201
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. >> woodruff: we have a battleground dispatch from a coastal city facing rising sea levels and the next big storm. >> if sandy were to come close or directly into norfolk i think we'd all be in big trouble. >> brown: we assess the latest diplomatic moves to end syria's war, as secretary of state hillary clinton meets with russia's foreign minister. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a program that aims to put students at low-achieving schools on a path to high school graduation. >> we're here to make things better. we're here to tutor kids. we're here to make sure that they stay on track. we are here to make sure that they graduate. we want to prepare them for high school. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this
angel gabriel was sent from god to a city of galilee named..." >> narrator: every sunday, in every corner of the world... >> "...the virgin, betrothed to a man whose name..." >> narrator: ...people gather to hear a story. >> "...and the virgin's name was mary." >> narrator: for more than 2,000 years, that story has been told and retold. >> "...and to bear a son." >> narrator: along the way, each generation has found in its telling its own meaning and interpretation. >> "'...you shall call his name jesus...'" >> narrator: that story, of a man called jesus of nazareth, a man who became jesus christ, was originally told by his first followers... >> "'...and be called the son of the most high.'" >> narrator: ...and then retold in accounts by later believers in the gospels. >> "the gospel according to st. luke." >> narrator: so began the building of a religion. now it is our turn, with the help of scholars and historians, theologians and archaeologists, to return to that time and use our best efforts to understand that story... of a man born in obscurity in whose name a faith was made.
a high-profile misconduct lawsuit involving a group of cops known as the riders. now city leaders are hoping a last-minute tentative deal will avoid a federal takeover of the department. matthai kuruvila, i know you've been covering this story. what are the details of this settlement and what does it mean for the department? >> well, what this agreement involves is an agreement between the police union, the city and professors attorneys who filed this original civil rights lawsuit. what they've decided on is creating a compliance director. now, this would be a quasi mayor of oakland in a sense in that he gets to -- he or she would have the power to fire the police chief with the court approval. they would have the power to direct the city administrators. those are two things currently only the mayor has. it's limited in scope in that it would only effect the reform tasks that are incomplete for the police department. the city had been very concerned that this potential receiver, or federal receiver, would have oversight over the entire police department. so all -- so all three sid
news from citi the beginning of other companies doing the same? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: 11,000 jobs are a lot of layoffs, even for a bank as huge as citi. and there could be more. that's because the monster firm is still struggling to recover from the great recession even though it has fired a lot of other workers in the last few years. the thing is, citi has a new c.e.o. in michael corbat, and experts say he's anxious to make his mark, even if that includes cutting staff. and the need to slim down is not unique to citi; it's industry- wide. a financial industry runs into huge problems. it happened in the '30s, and it happened in the last five years. when you go through these periods, you go through a lot of change. that industry is now trying to figure out what is the right size of the industry. >> reporter: still, economists say citi's action today is not the start of a new wave of mass layoffs across corporate america. the nation's job market may not be robust, but it's not frozen, either. in fact, today, the payroll firm a.d.p. reported 118,000 new private sector jobs w
owning a newspaper and radio and tv stations in the same big city. thus he would give the massive media companies free rein to devour more of the competition. the chairman is julius genachowski, appointed to the job by president barack obama. now, the fcc tried to pull this same stunt under a republica chairman back in the second term of george w. bush, but at hearings held around the country an angry public fought back. >> we told you a year ago when you came to seattle that media consolidation is a patently bad idea. no "ifs," "ands," or "buts" about it. so with all due respect i ask you, what part of that didn't you understand? >> i'm a republican and i'm a capitalist, but some areas of our private sector must be regulated. freedom of information is too important, we must be oactive in protecting that fundamental freedom. >> if the fcc is here wanting to know if chicago's residents are being wewell served, the answers no. if local talent is being covered, the answer is no. if community issues are being treated sensitively, the answer is no. if minority groups are getting the coverage
of a glorious past. and some parts of the city bustle with holiday energy. but not far away: closed-up storefronts. and, further below the surface, this: a health clinic set up by the greek branch of the international aid group, doctors of the world to serve the country's newly poor. dr. nikitis kanakis is its director. >> brown: kanakis group, in fact, had to cut back some of its work in africa because of the needs at home. here in perama, unemployment tops 50% as the shrinking economy has crippled much of the local shipping industry. at the same time, the deeply indebted greek government has made dramatic budget cuts, including to health benefits. the combination has left many here without access to private or public care. and that's meant a stunning rise in disease and mortality rates. >> brown: economists, of course, speak of a different kind of necessary medicine: the kind a deeply indebted nation must take. the price for living and consuming well beyond its means for far too long. >> the medicine is necessary. it was, though, delivered very abruptly. >> brown: as a government
jobs are in consumer banking. the move comes less than two months since a shakeup at citi ousting former c.e.o., vikram pandit. he was succeeded by michael corbat. the bank nearly collapsed during the crisis and ultimately received bailouts totaling $45 billion, money that citi has since repaid. roben farzhad has long watched the changes at citi for bloomberg "businessweek" and joins us again tonight. roben, welcome. today we heard that stocks soared on the news of these layoffs. what does that tell us about what was going on at citi? >> it's sad, actually. citigroup is know-- you could say the financial crisis is over but in the throes of an existential crisis. it doesn't know what it wants to be. investors have been clamoring for a while for citigroup to simplify, to shed payrolls, to be good at something. it does everything, but it isn't market leading, necessarily, in any one category. and by and large, they got the layoffs, at least the beginning round of layoffs that they wanted today. >> ifill: we know many of these layoffs are noin the u.s., but i assume part of the relati
mental health care being delivered within the average city, suburban town setting. prior to that, psychiatric illness had been often put aside in state hospitals in remote districts so nobody saw patients. there were close to 600,000 people in psychiatric hospitals at the peak, which was the early '60s. if that had ever continued that way, when you think of the expansion of the population, we'd probably have 3 million people or so in psychiatric state hospitals today. those were closed for -- not closed, but they were reduced down dramatically and there have been attempts to find other services. they've not been sufficient. >> why were they reduced? just a matter of money or were there other reasons or philosophical reasons why the state hospitals were closed in. >> the feeling was that you could have a more optimistic approach toward people in state hospitals, which i think was accurate. that some people with treatments that were being developed could function on the outside and many, many do. the majority of people with psychiatric problems function on a day-to-day basis like a
't belong in the streets of our city. >> woodruff: we assess the public policy questions raised by the shooting about access to guns, mental health issues, and more. >> ifill: hari sreenivasan reports from newtown on a community in mourning. >> woodruff: and as parents around the country nervously dropped their children off at school today, jeffrey brown talks to a psychiatrist and a school psychologist about what to say and not to say in times of crisis. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: a holiday season that should have
,013. indianapolis will be the first major american city to replace all city-owned cars with electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles. the program announced today calls for completing the switch by 2025. the city also plans to phase in fire trucks and other heavy vehicles that run on compressed natural gas. officials said they're asking auto makers to create plug-in hybrid police cars, which don't yet exist. retiring u.s. senator joe lieberman said goodbye to the senate today, with an appeal for principled compromise. he warned that gridlock is preventing progress on a host of problems. lieberman ran as the democratic vice presidential nominee in 2000. all told, he spent 24 years in the senate, first as a democrat, and since 2006, as an independent. a pantheon of music legends takes the stage tonight in new york, raising money for those hit hardest by hurricane sandy. the program for the "12-12-12" concert includes paul mccartney, bruce springsteen, the rolling stones, kanye west and alicia keys, among many others. the concert and telethon could reach two billion people on radio and t.v., in movi
city, i think we can do this. >> i do have a cynicism in me that says, you know, if we lose momentum we're going to be footnoted to the next horrible tragedy that unfolds. a month from now, two months from now. i hate that feeling. it's really cynical and a horrible thing to think. but it seems like that's sort of been the pattern over the last several years. >> i support responsible gun ownership. i've gone to firing ranges. i've fired guns. i don't own a gun. i would be happy to listen to responsible gun owners as well. i don't support banning all guns. just weapons that can just keech shooting and shooting and shooting. >> and i feel the same way. i grew up learning to shoot with my father. it's one of the few things we did together. >> the fact is we need to start enforcing laws we have. we need to make stronger laws. particularly regarding these high-powered weapons. that are brutally efficient at killing people. because there's no need for civilians to have those. i don't think we need to ban guns. i think we need to find the right balance. it may not just be the guns. it might al
. the only people they've ever met are dominicans. and by that evening, being the center of new york city having cable, lights, electricity. chinese guy upstairs. right next door a korean person. downstairs somebody from uruguay. the folks who are on the television, talking about all sorts of crazy stuff. i mean, sure, realism might try to approach that. but in my mind, when i was a kid, when i read about time travel. time travel felt like a much more honest description, to me, of what that meant, being transported from santo domingo '74 to new york and new jersey in '74. that was far more honest to the experience than anything i could have written realistically. >> at the age of six, you came? >> yeah, yeah. yeah, and for a young mind, i mean, it's an extraordinary leap. it's an extraordinary leap. and i think science fiction, i think fantasy, i think the genres do a wonderful job of describing all parts of, many parts of our society that realism doesn't do a great job of describing. >> didn't you say somewhere that "star wars," the "star wars" stories, you couldn't have a better framewo
of the most visited holiday landmarks in the city. and tom, the big board's tree is embroiled in a twitter battle for bragging rights as the city's best with another famous tree, the one at rockefeller center.. >> on my way to work this morning, i saw the tree by the new york stock exchange, and it looks pretty impressive. >> tom: we saw you putting ornaments on it. but the trees are tweeting? is that right? >> susie: not quite right, and those trees are a little too high for me to reach to put an ornament. that's "nightly business report" for tuesday, december 4. have a great evening, everyone, and you, too, tom. >> tom: good night, susie. we'll see you online at nbr.com, and back here tomorrow night. captioning sponsored by wpbt captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
.c.'s mayor and city council. next major tax break, state and local taxes. deductible in full from taxable income. this costs the federal government about $47 billion a year, almost 5% of the annual deficit. so what's the objection to getting rid of the state and local tax deduction? >> the deductions for state and local taxes lowers the cost the citizens are paying those state and local taxes. it means those governments can charge higher tax than they otherwise would. take that away they'll have to lower their revenues at a time when they're in trouble themselves or it's going raise the cost to the citizens who won't be happy about it. >> reporter: as lawmakers rush to rescue the economy from the fiscal cliff emergency, they have focused -- as have we thus far -- on itemized deductions. but when it comes to tax breaks or preferences, says robert... >> not just deductions. it includes things like exclusion from income, the biggest one of which is the we don't tax you on the premiums your employer pays for the health insurance we get. much bigger than anything on the deduction side. it's no
. and inside syria, rebels captured a second major military base near the northern city of aleppo. new details have emerged from south africa on the health of former president nelson mandela. the government announced today that military doctors are treating him for a recurring lung infection. mandela is 94 years old. he's been hospitalized since saturday, but officials said he is responding to treatment. an investigation of paying pro football players for causing injuries took a sharp new turn today. the man appointed to hear appeals, former nfl commissioner paul tagliabue, voided the suspensions of four current and former new orleans saints. tagliabue said actions by team coaches and others had contaminated the case. he did agree that three of the players should be fined. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to ray. >> suarez: cairo is the scene of mass rallies again tonight. demonstrators on both sides of the upcoming referendum are on the streets of the capital. their refrain was "bread, freedom and sharia" or islamic law from supporters of president mohammed morsi in cairo.
for children in a city, a country at war with itself. what kind of things are these little girls seeing beyond the school gates? >> ( translated ): we as educators don't support one side or the other. our concern is for the child to learn. so we keep the school open and help with their fears. we can't do as much as before, but the key thing is to try and deal with their anxiety. joarpt up down, left, right, 2, 3, 4-- out in the playground it's a p . e. lesson, exercises including run to the wall and back. here, theunning is for fun, but beyond the school walls, a smell or mo tar can land arywhere, any time. running can be a matter of life and death. for obvious reasons, the killing of small tchildren and teachers in and aroundch school buildings is pretty near the top of the news agenda at the moment,o it is in this educational district and the one next door alone, in the past two weeks, 35hildren and two teachers have been35 killed. the security building next to the school was car bombed recentl leaving a staff candid about the problems they face here. >> ( translated ): lot of children had t
city talks adopted today inviting opposition to start identifying areas where we can agree how to amend that constitution. >> ifill: the opposition has lost every battle that it has had against the president since he took over last june, are you two fractured, do you owe pose him? >> we have been fractured in the past. don't forget that after the uprising, after the revolution, the brotherhood has been underground for 780 years, it has been reaching out to the grass roots providing social services. they have excellent connection with average joe, if you like. opposition has been six months old. has been established in the last few months has been fractured. right now i think only in last month we had been getting together, establishing a united front. i think we're moving -- gaining ground right now. if you compare referendum a year and a half ago we've got 23%. this time we got 36%. we do hope that as the coming parliamentary election we can get majority. if we do that we finally would be able to correct the past of the revolution that focused on human dignity guarantees of freedom.
community programs in nevada city, which provides services for the county's mentally ill, including those who fall under laura's law, and many who don't. some of the patients, like 36- year-old jonathan maurer-- here for a long acting injection for his paranoid schizophrenia, and to meet with a psychiatrist-- resent being ordered to receive treatment. today maurer accepts voluntary treatment, for his paranoia; though he claims to have been mistreated previously. >> they gave me a catheter, and strapped me down naked on the hospital bed and then sedated me. they strip you of all your rights. i just don't see how they expect to logically assume that treating people with violence is going to cure violence. >> reporter: but debra simmons-- mother of a very disturbed son who gets treatment here-- praises laura's law and involuntary treatment for essentially saving his life. she didn't want his name used. >> he gets angry and agitated, doesn't sleep, doesn't eat, just goes through a whole cycle of events that just kind of spiral downward until he's become a concern to the society if he's out in
is the central city landmark of india, that happened on a sunday, it did have the effect of creating a cat and mouse, a game between the police. the protestors were extremely angry for example that no one from the government had come out to address them on the saturday when they had been tear gassed and water canonned as they approached the president's residence. sos there a sense of a government that was tone deaf and wasn't hearing the people. and that just made them more enraged. so in many ways it was an invitation for them to come back. so yes, the crackdown not only angered people but i think generated a lot of heat, that said, on sunday, which were the especially violent, especially violent protests, the numbers were a lot fewer. >> suarez: well, you talk about tone deaf politicians, have the nation's leaders heard the protestors now. are they responding in a different way? >> well, they're trying. the government has responded with what many governments often respond to in crisis management situation, commissions and inquiry, emotions are running very high and the call for capital p
, cities stripped. at night, the sea, barbaric bellows stifled, sprawls outside the window, framed like a dark, unruly landscape. behind us is a darker kind of dark: i watch your eyes for signals. the music makes a pause for prophecy: 'tomorrow, off-shore breezes and warmth to each other's warmth,' we do not listen." >> that was how long ago? >> 1968. >> you had been married -- >> we had been married 18 years, at that point. >> how does love change from then to now? >> it's more profound and more essential. it was very strong right from the beginning. we met on the first day of french class at northwestern university in 1946. and we've been together ever since. >> she became a playwright, didn't she? >> she was a playwright. and her plays have been produced about 60 times in mostly new york and los angeles. and i appreciate her work on my poetry and other things i write. she is a wonderful critic. four years ago, she had a stroke. and that kind of put an end to her writing. so that was a very sad thrust. >> i'm curious as to this poem, "this year's valentine." where did that come from?
the road to the city's airport. the u.s. soldier accused of espionage in the wikileaks document dump has conceded he considered suicide after his arrest. private first class bradley manning was cross-examined today in a pre-trial hearing at fort meade, maryland. he admitted making a noose out of bed sheets before being sent to the u.s. marine corps brig at quantico, virginia. manning says his treatment there was so harsh, the charges should be dismissed. the military says manning was a suicide risk, so jailers kept him isolated and took away his clothes. the holders of half of that record powerball jackpot of $588 million came forward today in missouri. a 52-year-old mechanic, mark hill, and his wife cindy were introduced in dearborn, just north of kansas city. cindy hill said she couldn't believe at first that their ticket was a winner. >> i didn't have my glasses and i was thinking is that the right numbers, is that the right numbers. and i was shakingment and i called my husband. i said i think i'm having a heart attack. and i drove to my mother-in-law's house to let her verify what i
staff for their own safety. those who remain will be restricted to the capital city, damascus. separately, the u.s. voiced mounting concern about activity at syrian government sites storing chemical weapons. this afternoon, president obama warned syrian leader bashar al- assad not to cross that line. oday i want to make it absolutely clear to assad and those under his command, the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences. and you will be held accountable. >> sreenivasan: in response, syria's government released a statement saying it would never use chemical weapons on its own people. the regime has never confirmed it has such weapons. there were warnings about greater curbs on the internet, as the world's nations gathered today for a summit on telecommunications. the 11-day conference in dubai is the first such review since 1988, well before the web was fully formed. the u.s. has raised concerns that china, russia, and others will seek new limits on
to stay clear. fighting near the airport and around the capital city has intensified in the past week. the latest amateur video showed street battles and a car set afire by a rocket attack. the exiled leader of hamas khaled meshaal entered gaza today for the first time. it was, in part, a show of defiance after the militant group's latest clash with israel. we have a report narrated by jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: he crossed the border from egypt with tears in his eyes. the leader of hamas setting foot on palestinian territory for the first time in 37 years. he had never been to gaza in his life but after kissing the tarmac apparently sobbing as he did so khaled meshaal said gaza had always been in his heart. there to greet him were the al qassam brigades. named after an arab rebel leader killed by the british in the 1930s. 80 years on the fight for self- rule isn't over. and thousands turned out to watch meshaal's cavalcade crawl through gaza city just days after a war with israel which left around 160 palestinians dead. >> the second was when i was
of targets. we've got crumbling infrastructure. it -- >> this city alone, where we're sitting, new york city, needs $50 billion to repair from the hurricane. >> once you get it rolling, there is plenty of stuff to do. so the notion that we don't have things that need to be done that could employ lots of people from very low-skilled people to more middle and high-skilled people, that's just a myth. >> there was a poll just the other day that you probably saw. something like half of all republicans believe that the 2012 election was stolen for obama by a group called acorn, which was -- which went out of business several years ago. it doesn't even exist. i mean, they just believe these conspiracy theories. and they circulate without barrier, because nobody will say anything to disagree with it. and if you hear the same propaganda over and over and over again, eventually you're going to start to believe it. >> there's this tremendous amount of brainwashing that goes on. and i don't understand how it happens. people convince themselves, you can understand it more in the public companies, because
: the streets of egypt's second largest city were filled with clashing islamists and their opponents today. the groups confronted each other in alexandria. it was the eve of a final-round vote on a draft constitution that's backed by islamists and president mohammed morsi. supporters of morsi and protesters threw rocks at each other, and riot police intervened with tear gas. officials said at least 40 people were injured. it was unclear who started the fight. north korea has detained an american citizen, and says he confessed to unspecified crimes. he was identified today as kenneth bae, a korean-american tour operator from washington state. north korean state media said he entered the country, with a tour, on november 3. the north has detained five other americans since 2009. all were released, eventually. american leaders past and present paid tribute today to the late senator daniel inouye of hawaii. a crowd filled the national cathedral in washington for the service honoring the japanese- american who became a war hero and served in the senate more than 50 years. president obama recall
york city's lincoln center, ford introduced the new lincoln mkz sedan, one of four luxury, and fuel efficient models coming out over the next four years. >> no one offers a car that's more fuel he fishant than the this hybrid no one offers a vehicle with the kind of craftsmanship and beautifully skimp find interior that we val. and when you drive it, it's going to be as fun to drive as a bmw but as quiet and comfortable at a lexus. >> susie: this is ford's latest campaign to stage a comeback for lincoln. when i talked to the c.e.o. alan mall ally i asked him if this is his last push to save the brand. >> we haven't focused on lincoln over the last few years because we had these other luxury brands. i think this is almost a beginning because now everybody knows that what ford did with ford, and now they all know ford is going to be 100% laser focused on lincoln. >> susie: when people think of a luxury car they think mercedes, bmw, not a lincoln. so how are you going to compete against those upscale brands? >> less than ten years ago lincoln was the number one luxury brand in the unit
that cities have announced 11,000 job cuts, is this the beginning of a trend, mark. >> no, susie, i don't think so. if washington can reasonably address the fiscal issues and i'm still confident that they will ultimately get it together. there will be a fair amount of -- but at the end of the day they'll get it together. if they're able to do that when we get into next spring, i do think we're going into much better shape. businesses will get it back and certainly investor will be happy about that. by this time next year i think we should see a much better job market because the housing whichs already starting to turn should be in full swing. so no, i don't think businesses are going to pull back. the only reason they would is if washington completely because this. at this point i don't think that's going to happen. >> susie: how do you think the federal reserve is going to read in today's jobs report. they're meeting on tuesday as you know. do you think it's going to trigger any new response from the fed? >> well, as you know the fed's on high alert. they've got their foot to the acce
in front of his dealership was not as clean as he thought it could be. >> the city street sweepers didn't come often enough so he bought his own street sweeper and has one of his staff people take care of that frequently. it is a be bit extreme i know that but at some level it has to register with his customers and pay him back in many, many ways, as i travel the world i love spotting examples of great customer service and hospitality, such as the coffee shop who writes, enjoy with whip cream on the top of a the bellman who goes to a neighboring hotel to find a foam pillow for me. the water dish for pets outside a bakery in our neighborhood. none of these is going to win a major business prize, but they do this: they separate themselves from the competition and give us a reason to keep coming back. i don't know what business you are in, but i know lots of other people speak and write like i do, i am always looking for ways to offer something that others do not. ask your staff, ask your customers, what's our version of street sweeping? i'm lou heckler. >> finally tonight, the story we ha
will not only have an impact on the national level, it will also hit states and eventually cities. if lawmakers fail to reach a deal before january 1, the cliff's across the board spending cuts and tax increases will impact how much money states get from the federal government. ruben ramirez reports from washington. >> reporter: we all know the numbers. failing to reach a deal by january 1 will result in $109 billion in automatic cuts to federal spending. and while that's a big number, what matters most to states and municipalities is the small print, detailing just where those cuts will happen. and standard & poors' gabe pettek says those details could still be months away. >> even if the policymakers in washington, d.c., resolve the immediate issue before january 1 or shortly thereafter, we think there are going to be several details related to the administration of tax policy and the way the federal government spends money that will have an important effect on state budgets. >> reporter: the pew center on the states reports around 18% of federal grants to states would be subject to sequestra
expectations. looking at month over month performance, the 20 city index fell 0.1% from september to october. still, s&p is optimistic about housing activity in the new year. >> 2013 should be a good year for housing, we're going into the year with a whole lot of momentum, we've seen very strong housing starts, very strong construction in 2012 but even with that strength construction is still way below where it should be and we have a lot of lost ground to make up. >> susie: david blitzer also expects home prices to continue to improve through the end of next year, and he believes that rebound in prices will help the u.s. economic recovery. still ahead, the outlook for stocks in 2013, we're joined by wayne kaufman, he's the chief market analyst at john thomas financial. president obama is due back in washington tomorrow, cutting short his hawaiian holiday vacation. he will be meeting with congressional leaders for one last push to prevent the economy from falling over the fiscal cliff next week. no specific bill is on the schedule in the senate or the house, and house republicans haven't yet
's like building a brick wall around a city and protecting it against an enemy. it's excellent protection against something entering our community that could cause illness. >> narrator: very strong herd community could completely eradicate many vaccine- preventable diseases, rendering vaccines unnecessary. this happened with smallpox in the 1970s. a decade ago, the world health organization had plans to eradicate polio, followed by measles, but vaccine scares around the world served to chip away at herd immunity, pushing these goals into the future. >> many of these germs belong to us only, which means if we can make enough humans immune simultaneously, we could eradicate them. and then, yes, we could stop vaccinating. there was actually a campaign hoping to eradicate polio from planet earth, as we did small pox, and notice we're not vaccinating anymore for smallpox because it's gone. but at the moment, at least, while they're in the world, there still is the potential for outbreaks if people are willing to stop vaccinating prematurely. >> narrator: why is it so hard for some americans to
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 58 (some duplicates have been removed)

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